Dairy Farmers’ TOP 10 Dairy Cattle Disease and Management Concerns Addressed

Author: Meagan King, University of Guelph

As part of the National Dairy Study’s Needs Assessment (Phase 1), close to 700 dairy farmers completed a survey asking them to identify their top management and disease priorities. The five-year research project was led by Dr. David Kelton at the University of Guelph and his collaborators under the Dairy Research Cluster 2.

The survey resulted in the following priorities identified by Canadian dairy farmers:

Top Management Issues

  1. Animal welfare
  2. Reproductive health
  3. Costs of disease
  4. Cow deaths/longevity
  5. Udder health

Top Disease Issues

  1. Lameness
  2. mastitis
  3. Calf diarrhea
  4. Abortions
  5. Respiratory disease

The Dairy Research Cluster team has compiled resources linked to the top issues in the following interactive poster. Scroll over each priority to discover a pop up window containing sources of information on each issue and how to address it.

National Dairy Study – Resources on milking management, mastitis prevention and lameness

Three VLOGs (video blogs) featuring students responsible for projects and results about milking management, mastitis prevention, lameness, and hock lesions in the National Dairy Study (Dairy Research Cluster 2) are now available on the Dairy Research Cluster’s You Tube channel here:

Assessing Lameness in Dairy Cattle with Stephanie Croyle

Training Assessors:  A key step for the National Dairy Study with Stephanie Croyle

Understanding the Adoption of Best Milking Practices for Udder Health with Emilie Belage

Winning video entries – My research in 180 seconds

During the Dairy Research Symposium in February 2018, two students won prizes for their video entries in the student video competition, My research in 180 seconds. Catalina Medrano-Galarza from the University of Guelph won first place and Meagan King, also of the University of Guelph, placed second. Congratulations to both students for their great work!

Management practices and calf health using group housing and automated milk feeders

Lameness and health disorders in robotic milking systems