It’s time to register for Dairy Farmers of Canada’s Nutrition and Health Symposium!

2019

Dairy Farmers of Canada’s nutrition and health symposium will focus on Sustainable Diets.

Attendees will have the opportunity to listen to internationally recognized speakers on this topic from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, McGill University, the University of California, Davis and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

The symposium will provide participants:

  • A better understanding of the definitions and goals for sustainable diets;
  • An expanded understanding of the impact of animal agriculture on environmental sustainability, particularly as it relates to Canadian food production; and,
  • Provide insights on the nutritional implications of plant-based or ‘’flexitarian” diets as proposed by EAT-Lancet.

To view the program and register:

–  Montreal, on October 29, 2019 – also available via webcast in French
–  Edmonton, on October 30, 2019 – also available via webcast in English

For more information, visit www.dairynutrition.ca.

Dairy Research Cluster 3: FEATURED RESEARCH PROJECT

In the coming months, we will be featuring one of the 15 new Cluster 3 research projects in each blog, providing our followers the opportunity to learn more about the research underway, how it’s associated to dairy farmers’ research priorities, why it’s important for dairy innovation and provide more information about the scientists involved in the projects.

We hope you enjoy the read!

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Optimizing health and production of cows milked in robotic systems

New research started in 2018 under the Dairy Research Cluster 3 is investigating ways to maximize the efficiency of robotic milking systems and optimize cow health within those systems. The project, led by Dr. Trevor DeVries of the University of Guelph, is very timely – about 11% of farms enrolled in a milk recording program in Canada use robots and the adoption of this technology continues to increase.

The scope of the new research is impressive. This is the first study of its kind to investigate robotic milking technologies on farms across all provinces, using data collected in collaboration with Lactanet. The research team includes top Canadian experts in the fields of dairy cattle health, farm management and nutrition, spanning across Canada: Drs. Greg Penner and Tim Mutsvangwa (University of Saskatchewan), Drs. Karin Orsel and Ed Pajor (University of Calgary), Dr. Todd Duffield (University of Guelph) and Richard Cantin, Débora Santschi and René Lacroix (Lactanet).

The research team will be identifying cow and herd-level factors that influence milk production, cow health and the efficiency of robot use in a large-scale sample of dairy farms. The information will be used to identify best management practices to help farmers using robotic systems produce milk more efficiently and maintain excellent dairy cow health, with a specific focus on health in early lactation and feeding practices in robotic barns, based on barn design and layout, for all stages of lactation.

“Considering the number of farms using robotic technology and the potential for growth, there are still gaps in our knowledge on the best strategies farmers can use to address some of the challenges we identified in the Dairy Research Cluster 2 research. This new research will build on those results,” said Dr. DeVries.

In the Dairy Research Cluster 2 project on automated milking systems, the researchers demonstrated that lower milk production and issues with cow health, especially in early lactation, impacted the profitability of adopting robotic systems. Lameness, for example, was one of the primary factors identified with an overall negative impact on milk yield per cow and per robot. Clinically lame cows (gait score of 3 out of 5 or greater) were 2 times more likely to be fetched and produced 1.6 kg of milk less per day than healthy cows and milked 0.3 fewer times per day. Severely lame cows (gait score of 4 out of 5 or greater) were most likely to turn into chronic fetch cows.

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Watch the video about some of the findings from the Dairy Research Cluster 2 project prepared by Meagan King.

Over a 12-month period, this group of researchers will be collecting data on housing, feeding and management by farm and by robotic system, and extract milk recording data for each herd. The data will be analyzed to assess cow and herd level impacts on milk production, health and robot use.

“The extent of the dataset collected by farm and by region will allow us to assess robotic system performance. We will then be able to make some associations or differentiations and develop benchmarks dairy farmers can use if they are already milking with robots or are thinking about installing the technology on their farm. We look forward to developing some very practical independent information for Canadian dairy farmers that is science-based and supports their application of the technology in the most efficient way,” concluded DeVries.

Quick project facts

  • Project timeline: 2018-2022
  • Budget: $300,000
  • Funding partners: AAFC, DFC, with an in-kind contribution from Lactanet
  • Number of farms involved: 200+
  • Number of students to be trained: 8+

 The research team

T DeVries 2019

Dr. Trevor DeVries (Professor and Canada Research Chair in Dairy Cattle Behaviour and Welfare) is the Principal Investigator, project coordinator, and the primary advisor for the Ph.D. student and undergraduate summer research assistants at the University of Guelph. Dr. DeVries will coordinate all the data collection, particularly the data collected in Ontario and Quebec.

 

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Dr. Todd Duffield (Professor, Ontario Veterinary College) is a Collaborator and an advisory committee member to the Ph.D. student at the University of Guelph, and is assisting in project design, analysis, and interpretation.

 

Unknown-2Unknown-3Dr. Gregory Penner (Associate Professor in Nutritional Physiology) and Dr. Timothy Mutsvangwa (Professor of Ruminant Nutrition and Metabolism), University of Saskatchewan, are providing expertise in dairy cattle nutritional physiology. As Co-Investigator, Dr. Penner is responsible for advising the undergraduate summer research assistants who will collect data on farms in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Both researchers will contribute to data interpretation and manuscript writing.

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Dr. Karin Orsel (Associate Professor Veterinary Epidemiology, University of Calgary) as Co-Investigator, is responsible for advising the undergraduate summer research assistants who will collect data on farms in Alberta. Drs. Orsel and Dr. Pajor (Collaborator) will contribute to data interpretation and manuscript writing.

 

UnknownThe project involves key collaborations from Lactanet:  Richard Cantin, Débora Santschi and René Lacroix. They will provide assistance in the identification and recruitment of herds, expertise in data management, as well as provide access to their milk recording data (subject to producer agreement and consent to participate in the study).

 

Lactanet Forum for Dairy Cattle Improvement

Unknown.pngThe first Dairy Cattle Improvement Industry Forum under the new Lactanet organization was held in Victoria, B.C. last September 17-18, 2019. Hosted by WestGen, which is celebrating its 75thAnniversary, more than 65 dairy farmers, advisors and other dairy stakeholders took part in the forum. The Dairy Research Cluster had its banners on location and distributed the latest information on Dairy Research Cluster 2 results and new Dairy Research Cluster 3 projects.

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Barbara Paquet, Chair of Lactanet (Photo Credit: Daniel Lefebvre, Lactanet)

Attendees heard from Lactanet Chair Barbara Paquet and CEO Neil Petreny on the vision and actions for the new organization. Several experts spoke on the development of existing and novel traits for dairy cattle improvement, genetic trends in western Canada, the history of artificial insemination in the West and a panel of dairy farmers provided their perspectives on new genetic traits needed for the future.

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Dr. Christine Baes, University of Guelph

Dr. Christine Baes of the University of Guelph gave an overview of the status of research on traits and new developments, including an introduction to her new research underway in the Dairy Research Cluster 3.

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Bonnie Cooper

The 2019 Dairy Cattle Improvement Industry Distinction Award was also presented to recipient Bonnie Cooper. As editor of the Holstein Journal, Ms. Cooper was recognized for her excellence in communicating to producers the events, people, animals and developments that have helped shape the Canadian dairy industry over the span of her 45-year career. She was thanked for her work to help make the Canadian Holstein Brand the envy of the world and for communicating breed improvement developments on behalf of Holstein Canada, the Canadian Dairy Network and key industry partners.

 

Featured

Summaries of 15 new research projects launched under the Dairy Research Cluster 3 now available online

DRC3Optimizing health and production cows milked in robotic systems

Fifteen new research projects targeting dairy farm efficiency and sustainability, cow health and welfare, milk quality, and dairy and cardiometabolic health were announced under the Dairy Research Cluster 3 in July 2019. Joint industry and government commitments to the Dairy Research Cluster 3 total $16.5 million, including the contribution from major partners Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Dairy Farmers of Canada, Lactanet Canada and Novalait. Moreover, 1,300 individual dairy farms and 10 dairy processors will be investing their time in the proposed research activities by collaborating with the research teams.

A summary of each research project is now available online at dairyresearch.ca for download. The summaries contain the list of researchers working on the project, the amount invested in the project, the objectives, a brief overview, as well as the expected outcomes.

Copies of the summaries will be distributed at upcoming conferences where the Dairy Research Cluster kiosk is installed.